The process of signaling to the wait staff that they can clear your plate after a meal differs from country to country. To do it the American way, set your knife and fork next to each other in the center of the plate. To do it like the French, cross your knife and fork. 

 

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6 responses to “Removing the Dinner Plate”

  1. janerm says:

    I was taught to leave my knife and fork side by side at 4 o’clock on the plate.

  2. janerm says:

    I was taught to leave my knife and fork side by side at 4 o’clock on the plate.

  3. ewenadamson says:

    In the UK I was taught to set the knife and fork together at about the ‘five o’clock’ position

  4. ewenadamson says:

    In the UK I was taught to set the knife and fork together at about the ‘five o’clock’ position

  5. blueskyexplorer says:

    I’ve noticed a trend over time of waitstaff whisking your plate away as soon as possible — without regard to whether your dining companions have finished eating. This appalling trend has spread to even the most expensive restaurants. Dining etiquette dictates that no plates be removed until everyone at the table is finished. That way, there aren’t three people with empty places and one person left slowly eating their salad feeling pressured to finish quickly.

  6. blueskyexplorer says:

    I’ve noticed a trend over time of waitstaff whisking your plate away as soon as possible — without regard to whether your dining companions have finished eating. This appalling trend has spread to even the most expensive restaurants. Dining etiquette dictates that no plates be removed until everyone at the table is finished. That way, there aren’t three people with empty places and one person left slowly eating their salad feeling pressured to finish quickly.

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