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Q: I would like to know the order of marks on items made in Japan. Which is oldest, “Nippon,” “Made in Occupied Japan,” “Made in Japan” or just “Japan”? Does it make a difference if the mark is red, green, black or another color?

A: Most pieces marked with the name of a country were made after 1891, when the McKinley Tariff Act was passed. Pieces from Japan were marked “Nippon,” the transliteration of the Japanese word for Japan. After 1915 the words “Made in…” were usually added. Beginning in 1921, U.S. Customs required country names to be in English, and the word “Japan” was used instead of “Nippon.” Items marked “Made in Occupied Japan” were made between February 1947 and April 1952. After that, just the word “Japan” was used again. According to experts on 19th- and 20th-century Japanese ceramics, the color does not help date a mark. Red, green and black were used most years. There is no explanation for when other colors were used.

 

 

 

Comments  

#3 occupied japan bowlBlynnp 2018-04-12 23:38
hi, Koiman. I found out that the dragon and a phoenix means fung shay.. a balance of good and evil. when its on a big plate and the middle has hearts it was for the prince and princess for their wedding. it sounds beautiful.
#2 value on occupied japan pieceskoiman 2018-04-09 12:13
i have a occupied japan small decorative bowl i got at an antique action and was wondering the value of it. It has dragons and birds on the outside and Japanese letters on the outside and on the inside it says hoto hoto.
#1 RE: Marks on Items Made in Japanbaloney 2017-03-13 18:31
I have a dragonware tea set with a mark that is something like Noritake's wreath, only simpler, with the letter "T" and "Japan" underneath. The spout of the tea-pot is a dragon's head. This set was given to my grandmother prior to WWII by a tenant who was in the import-export business. I would like to know more about it. The china is translucent and very pale pink and yellow under the heavier markings.

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