Happy #whatsitwednesday!

Be the first to guess what the pictured item is by leaving a comment below. If you have your own whatsit, our editors can include it in a future post. Please send an email to editor@kovels.com and attach a clear picture, the size and any markings. Hopefully, we will be able to identify it for our readers!

The pictured item is 15 centimeters wide by 14 centimeters tall by 8 centimeters deep.

Note: For those of you who signed up to get notified of each response (by checking the “Notify me of follow-up comments” box in the “Add Comments” section) and find it’s generating too much email, you can unsubscribe to the “Whatsitwednesday” comments by clicking the “unsubscribe” link in the “Whatsitwednesday” email you receive.

Kovels Item

(Photo: Ebay/sbtradinglondonlimited)

Love is in the Air

Romance may be in the air, but did you know that Valentine’s Day started out as the Roman festival called Lupercallia that included fertility rites and the pairing off of women with men by lottery? The men sacrificed a goat and a dog, then whipped women with the hides of the animals they had just killed. Young women would actually line up for the men to hit them, believing this would make them fertile. The matchmaking lottery involved young men drawing the names of women from a jar. The couple would be together, so to speak, for the duration of the two-day festival.

Not very romantic, right? Modern Valentine’s Day started sometime in the 14th century. It may have taken its name from a Roman priest and physician who was martyred about 270 by the emperor Claudius II Gothicus. It became more a day of romance (and not whipping).

Valentine’s Day greetings cards started appearing in the 1500s and by the late 1700s, they were being commercially printed. The first printed cards were used in the United States in the mid-1800s, and the elaborate, flowery cards are popular with collectors. Hearts, flowers (usually red roses, the symbol of beauty and love) and Cupid abound.

All types of valentines are popular with collectors and prices range from 25 cents to more than $100. Some collectors hunt for Victorian valentines with die-cut images that open into three-dimensional views. Later versions, like the valentine pictured here, with folded honeycomb paper that pops open into a design, are more expensive. This valentine is from the 1920s-1930s and is worth about $10 to $20.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

my heart is thine my valentine

Dresden Globe Mark

Q: Can you tell me what company used this mark? It pictures a globe with the word “Dresden” on it.

A: The Potters’ Co-Operative Co. of East Liverpool, Ohio, used this mark. The co-operative started in 1882 and included eight potteries from the East Liverpool area. One of those potteries was The Dresden Pottery Works, which was started by Brunt, Bloor, Martin and Company in 1875 or 1876. Whiteware, hotel ware, toilet ware, and some decorative wares were made. The pottery was renamed Dresden Pottery Company in 1925 and went out of business in 1927.

dresden pottery globe mark

Drive-by Romance Takes on New Meaning

With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, romance is top on many minds. As we know, sometimes love just happens — you are in the right place at the right time to meet the person of your dreams. For one Boca Raton, Florida woman, the ultimate symbol of romance crossed her path in a turning lane while she was on her way to Costco. Deb Salazar and her husband were a few miles from the store when they spotted it. “It was in the turn lane, in a great big, old-fashioned dry cleaner’s box,” she said.

What was in the 3-foot long and 2-foot wide box decorated with the words “Bridal Chest” in script? An antique wedding dress and matching lacy hat. Salazar said the dress looks 70 to 80 years old and is tiny, probably a size 0. The dress is lace with a sheer bodice and lace cap sleeves. The hat is swirled lace and what looks to be a wide brim. Salazar doesn’t want to picture the whole dress because she’s hoping to find the real owner who can describe the dress in detail.

So, attention all Boca Raton-area residents: If you were driving near Costco with your mother’s, grandmothers or elderly aunt’s wedding gown in a professional dry-cleaning storage box, are you sure it didn’t fall out of your vehicle? If it is missing, you might want to track down Deb Salazar with a description of the dress.

Love is in the air, which is much better for a wedding dress than being squashed in the middle of a busy street.

vintage wedding dress found in box in road florida bridal chest label

Photo: Patch.com / Deb Salazar

Identify Photos Sooner Rather than Later

Identify a photograph with a note written with a lead pencil on the back of the photo. Don’t use a felt-tip or ballpoint pen. It can bleed thru to the image. Record the date, location, people and any other important comments like “wedding” or “family reunion.”

 

Replace Missing Stones in Costume Jewelry

You can glue missing stones back into costume jewelry. Find the glue used to glue watch crystals into the case. The glue will not yellow. Remove all traces of old glue. Put some in the setting, then lower the stone into place and be sure it is level.

 

Veteran’s Unworn Rolex Stuns With $700,000 Valuation

Next time you buy yourself something special – or receive it as a gift! – do NOT tear into the packaging to get to the present. Carefully open the box or container. Delicately remove the gift, without tearing or ripping the insides of the box. And save all the paperwork, including receipts and warranty paperwork. A veteran featured recently on Antiques Roadshow in a show taped in North Dakota did all that and it paid off with potentially a $700,000 windfall.

While in the Air Force stationed in Thailand, the veteran named David bought himself a 1971 Oyster Cosmograph waterproof Rolex for $345, including a 10 percent military discount. He had noticed pilots wearing Rolex watches and, after wanting one for several years, splurged about a month’s pay to buy it. But once he received the watch in April 1974, he decided it was too nice to wear, and certainly too nice to get wet. It spent decades in a safety deposit box, taken out only a couple of times to be viewed. And then he brought it in to be seen by Roadshow experts.

Because the watch was never worn, still had the silver foil label on its back, had all the original paperwork, including an unfilled out warranty, and was a rare “Oyster” watch, the value of the watch rose from about $400,000 for just the watch, to between $500,000 and $700,000.

On camera, the man theatrically fell to the ground in shock. We at Kovels would not be as shocked. We know that original packaging and pristine condition always add significant value to collectibles. For more tips on buying and selling, go to https://www.kovels.com/how-to-buy-or-sell.

Photo: Goodnewsnetwork.org | Swins

oyster cosmograph number 6263 waterproof rolex watch

It’s #whatsitwednesday!

Be the first to guess what the pictured item is by leaving a comment below. If you have your own whatsit, our editors can include it in a future post. Please send an email to editor@kovels.com and attach a clear picture, the size and any markings. Hopefully, we will be able to identify it for our readers!

The pictured item is 8 1/2 inches high by 36 inches wide by 15 inches deep.

 

 

 

Note: For those of you who signed up to get notified of each response (by checking the “Notify me of follow-up comments” box in the “Add Comments” section) and find it’s generating too much email, you can unsubscribe to the “Whatsitwednesday” comments by clicking the “unsubscribe” link in the “Whatsitwednesday” email you receive.

(Photo: Crescent City Auction Gallery)

Kovels’ Most Popular Articles of 2019

In the world of antiques and collectibles, there is one certainty from year to year: Collectors love a story with a happy ending. That is probably why many of the Kovels top 10 most popular articles of 2019 involved lost treasures and rediscovered historical wonders. But our discerning readers also wanted to learn about top souvenirs, what NOT to collect, and of course, the most up-to-date information from our Online Price Guide. Thank you for turning to Kovels for antiques and collectibles information all these years, and happy 2020 hunting!

February 2020 Prices

ADVERTISING Door push, “Wear Finck’s Detroit-Special Overalls,” tin lithograph, embossed, trademark pig, red, white, & blue, 7 x 3 5/8 in., $614 Display, Perfect Fitting, Munsing Wear, Union Suits, tin lithograph, die cut, image of 6 boys & girls in white union suits, countertop, easel back, 15 1/2 x 24 in., $740 Hood ornament, metal, […]