Kovels.com Item of the Week March 5, 2012: Bakelite Alarm Clock

Remember to set your vintage alarm clock ahead one hour before you go to bed on Saturday night. Daylight Savings Time begins at 2:00 am on March 11, so “spring forward” (and then “fall back” as the saying goes, in November). This 4 1/4-inch orange Bakelite clock was made by General Electric and sold for $360 at a Rago auction.

Bakelite alarm clock

Benjamin Franklin first suggested the idea of a time change. He published an essay about the thrift of natural versus artificial light during his stay in Paris in 1784. A century later, in 1907, an English builder, William Willet, suggested it again.

Daylight Savings Time became the law in the U.S. during World War I to conserve resources for the war effort. It was observed for seven month in 1918 and 1919. It wasn’t popular, so it was repealed. Congress reinstated it in 1942 during World War II. Time remained one hour ahead year-round until September 30, 1945. States and towns were then free to observe Daylight Savings Time or not until the passage of The Uniform Time Act of 1966.

Find more clock prices in the FREE online price guide at Kovels.com and in Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles Price Guide 2012.

Find more pictures and news on our Latest News page by clicking here.

 

 

Comments  

#2 novtubrad 2012-03-07 14:14
Hi,
The clock is not Bakelite, it is made of Catalin, a much more desireable product.
Here is a link that will help readers tell the difference.
http://reviews.ebay.com/Bakelite-amp-Catalin-All-you-need-to-know-Testing?ugid=10000000000748322
#1 Bakelite Alarm Clockandy 2012-03-07 13:26
Strictly speaking, that General Electric alarm clock was made not by G.E. themselves, but by Telechron, who marketed their electric clocks under both their own name and that of G.E. It contains a Telechron movement inside.

Login to leave a comment.


Join The Discussion

Kovels.com is pleased to share your comments. Your postings may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in our print publications. We encourage a variety of opinions, but ask that you refrain from profanity and hate speech. To post comments, you must be a registered user of Kovels.com. Please remember that your username will appear with any comments you post.